Referrals, References and Pricing

 

Crowd_Surfer_at_Music_Midtown_-_1997

Pragmatic Marketing’s December activity/box of the month is Referrals and References. What does this have to do with pricing? Plenty.

If you are systematically executing the activity of creating and collecting referrals and references, then you probably have a formalized program on turning customers into valuable marketing tools. If you don’t then you are hopefully collecting and organizing data about customers who like you, at least when they fall in your lap.

We gather referrals and references to help us sell more product. Referrals help us find new customers while references help us close deals. But here’s where pricing comes in:

Referrals and References increase new customers’ willingness to pay.

Since pricing is all about creating and capturing value (i.e. customers’ willingness to pay) then anything we can do to create value helps us win at higher prices.

Think about your own decisions. You are thinking about buying a new kitchen appliance, say a panini press. You haven’t shopped yet, but in a conversation with a friend he tells you about the one he has, brand X, and how it makes great sandwiches. He is extremely happy with it. Now once you decide to buy a panini press, wouldn’t you pay a few dollars more for brand X over brand Y just because your friend has it and loves it?

Just like you would pay a little more because one brand comes highly recommended from a friend, so will your customers.  Think of a referral as one more “feature” your product has that your competition does not.  Your customers value that feature and would pay a little more to have it, all else being equal.

When we put together a program to systematically collect and use referrals and references, we increase both the volume of sales and the price at which we can win. Sure seems like a win-win for us.

 

Photo by M S